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\begin{frame}
  \frametitle{Propositional Logic: Introduction}
  
  \begin{exampleblock}{}
  \begin{itemize}
    \item 
      \emph{If} it rains 
      \emph{and} Janneke does \emph{not} have her umbrella,\\
      \emph{then} she is wet.
  \pause\smallskip
    \item 
      Janneke is \emph{not} wet.
  \pause
    \item 
      It rains.
  \end{itemize}
  \pause\smallskip
  \aemph{Thus}, \pause Janneke has her umbrella. 
  \end{exampleblock}
  
  \pause\bigskip
  We can translate this to propositional logic as follows:
  \begin{align*}
    p &:\quad \text{It rains.}\\
    q &:\quad \text{Janneke has umbrella.}\\
    r &:\quad \text{Janneke is wet.}
  \end{align*}
  \pause
  
  Then the sentences above becomes:
  \begin{align*}
    \mpause[1]{ (p \wedge \neg q) \to r }
    \mpause{, \;\; \neg r }
    \mpause{,\;\; p \quad }
    \mpause{ \models \quad q }
  \end{align*}
  
\end{frame}